Last Flight

Exploring the Moosehead Lake region, we spied a sign pointing down a dirt road to a B 52 Memorial. We couldn’t imagine what that would be, but there was only one way to find out and that was to take the road.
It was a bumpy, dusty ride made tolerable by magnificent fall color .
In the distance were mountains, one of which we commented resembled an elephant. We later learned that it was called Elephant Mountain and was part of what we were about to experience.

Seven miles or so down the road, we arrived at the site to be welcomed by a sign giving indication we were going to experience something we’d not expected.

Before we’d walked too far, we saw what was the first of many airplane parts.

Needless to say that was sobering.

Debris was scattered throughout a heavily wooded area which made us wonder how and when such an obviously devastating accident had occurred.

As we continued further into the area, we became more solemn as even larger remains littered the forest.

At last, we came to the place where some questions were answered. We were surprised that anyone could have survived such a tragic crash and wondered how the survivors were rescued in such an isolated area.

When we returned to the inn later in the day, the first thing we did was research the event. It occurred January 1963 on a routine exercise that you can learn more about here. What was astonishing is that the two survivors withstood -30 degree temperatures in a snowy terrain for hours before being rescued. With today’s sophisticated location equipment they would have been found much sooner.

Needless to say, we were very moved by what we saw and appreciative of the effort to honor the men whose lives were lost.

I so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

Sunday Wanderings

Me: Hey, we’re running out of time for a last adventure before we go back to Houston.

Hubby: So what do you have in mind?

Me: Hmmm, how about a couple of days at Moosehead Lake?

Hubby: OK, if you can find us a place to stay.

That proved to be a challenge, but luckily Blair Hill Inn had one room available.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur room was beautifully appointed

with spectacular views of the lake and mountains.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASo, what’s special about the Moosehead Lake region? It is all about the outdoors-fishing, canoeing, kayaking, hunting, hiking-in a pristine environment.

Speaking of hiking, the Appalachian Trail runs through the region and ends at nearby Mount Katadin.

It’s not likely I’ll ever do the entire 2100 mile trek, but I have a bit of it under my belt!

For campers, the area has several state parks with ample campsites.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASome folks had seasonal touches which made “roughing” it seem rather homey.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALike most of Maine, the population is sparse, and Kotadjo states it best!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt’s said that moose outnumber humans 3:1, but we saw nary a one. Only a lone deer crossed our path.

When we got to Kotajdo, it was about lunch time and there wasn’t much on the road ahead of us. That meant stopping here where an enterprising soul provided staples for hunters and fishermen and served a few sandwiches.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA. We were the only people there whose dress gave us away as visitors. When our Texas license plate was noted, there was some surprise we weren’t driving a pickup!

The Moosehead Lake region is unspoiled, and every effort is made to keep it that way. Whenever there is a proposal to increase development be it residential or wind farms, it meets strong resistance.

While that may not seem like progress, it is one of the reasons Maine is one of this country’s gifts when it comes to natural beauty.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

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Dishing It and Digging It

Sunday Wanderings

From miles around, folks follow the road signs to Beth’s, a farm market with all things fresh and local. For me, it’s a 30 mile round trip worth every mile and the time it takes to get there.

This time of year Beth’s is a real treat as the market is loaded with much of what is perfect for fall decor.

There are pumpkins and gourds galore which makes it very hard to choose just a few.

Many of the pumpkins have names that are both perfectly descriptive

And tickle the funny bone. To tell the truth I didn’t think these were so ugly and added them to my cart.

No way were a couple of these being left behind!  Now there will have to be a ladies lunch to show them off.

Inside Beth’s is a wonderland of interesting produce all grown on the premises.

When there’s so much to choose from the real challenge is not to overbuy.

That’s a challenge I’m seldom able to meet as one of everything wants to jump in my basket.

When the basket can hold no more, I join the crowd in line and start thinking about creative ways to use everything. That’s part of the fun!

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

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Dishing It & Digging It

Between Happy and Sad

I like many things about fall. Rich color and texture, the smell of wood smoke, falling leaves on morning walks, pumpkins and gourds, the feel of fleece against my skin, morning coffee in front of a fire all make me happy, BUT there are some things that make me sad.
img_2391Early October means putting Pipe Dreams into winter storage and that symbolizes the loss of something I love about being in Maine.
Among my happiest moments are those when we leave Rockport Harbor behind and go exploring. Sadly, this is the last outing and the memory will have to last through the winter.
As we venture out, I see sights that are so familiar yet manage to look different every time. In the distance overlooking Penobscot Bay is Beech Hill, today shrouded by mist.
Heading out to the bay we pass Indian Island with its now inoperable lighthouse. Changing light and shifting tides always make me think I’m seeing it for the first time.
Perry CreekOur plan is to spend the night on the boat so we go to Perry Creek, a favorite spot. It’s a popular boating destination, but tonight the summer crowd is gone and all is quiet except for a soft breeze blowing through the trees and the sound of water gently lapping against the hull.
That makes it very easy to relax while the hubby and I enjoy predinner snacks and a game or two of backgammon. Yes, life is good.
We called it a day beneath a star filled sky, but we woke to a world blanketed in fog and with its own kind of beauty.

Close by a heron lingered patiently as if waiting for it to clear.

After a while a gull left its perch to check things out.

We sat munching a simple breakfast and watching the tranquil morning unfold around us.

Times like this are such special gifts, but nothing lasts forever so when the fog cleared we headed back to Rockport Harbor, and I savored every glimpse of places that I love.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

 

Destination: Morse’s

One thing I’ve gotten used to in Maine is driving from here to there whether it be to Portland for a city fix or to a favorite destination in the countryside.  

There are a number of places in the middle of what seems like nowhere.  One such is Morse’s, described by the sign as a little German restaurant.

It is that and so much more.  Shelves are filled with goodies, many specialties from Germany and other European countries.  

The deli is one of my all time favorites.  There are oodles of cheeses and pates and sausages making it very hard to choose one or two.  Never do I go to Morse’s without coming out with  bags full.

What Morse’s is best known for locally is its house made sauerkraut.  I’m not usually a big fan, but theirs, as the sign says, can’t be beat.

Since Morse’s is a restaurant, it’s impossible to go there and not have breakfast or lunch.  The hubby always likes something with German sausage.

Me, I can never resist a Reuben sandwich loaded with corned beef and Morse’s delicious sauerkraut.

As many good places to eat as there are in Houston, I love what Maine has to offer.  The eateries are unpretentious and it’s hard to find one where the food isn’t delicious.

Morse’s is one that is on the top of my list. Maine 2009 3 

Getting there has as an extra bonus rural countryside that is particularly beautiful this time of year.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

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Dishing It and Digging It

More Maine

Lest you think Maine is all about the coast and islands and boating, come with me a few miles inland. Very quickly it becomes rural making you think you are in a different place.

Town lines are far apart as are houses in the scarcely populated areas.

Along the road, cattle laze in the fields

and horses stare out to see what is interrupting the quiet.

Farm equipment suggests a way of making a living that is quite different than that on the coast.

With fall closing in, there is evidence of gathering for winter

and wagons are stacked high with hay that will keep livestock fed when grass is covered with snow.

Barns are as common as houses in the countryside.

Sometimes when I’m taking pictures, a curious neighbor comes out to chat which is a great way to learn about an area.  Folks like to tell what they know as happened with this barn.  It was built in the mid 1800’s by a gentleman who then owned thousands of acres that were farmed and provided timber.  Over the years, heirs lost interest in working the land and sold off the property bit by bit.The barn fell into disrepair until a few years ago someone who respected its architecture bought and restored it.  These days it’s used for nothing but storage, but the owner keeps it in pristine condition which is probably what caught my eye.

Another characteristic of these rural areas are general stores.  Keep in mind that Maine is made up of many small towns and grocery stores are few and far between.  

The general store provides basic necessities and serves as a gathering place for locals to meet and share what’s going on.  In some cases, it serves as the post office and an offsite bank.

It’s not surprising to find the general store is also the local eatery.

and I’m telling you there are some pretty good vittles there.

Yep, Maine has lots to offer if one takes the time to explore.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

 

 

 

 

Out With a Bang

Summer comes late and leaves early in Maine.  Most folks say the season is from July 4 through Labor Day.  That’s not very long!

Windjammer FestivalHere on the midcoast, Camden says good bye to summer with the Windjammer Festival when schooners from the area join Camden’s fleet and take over the harbor.It is a fun filled weekend with activities and displays of all kinds.

Windjammer FestivalNothing brings more cheers than the lobster crate race, definitely for the young and nimble!

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Some schooners are available for cruises on Penobscot Bay, always a favorite adventure for visitors.  With all sails up, the windjammer is a majestic sight,  a symbol of a bygone era.

Other schooners host an open house to give folks an idea of what it’s like to live aboard.  It’s pretty close quarters, and one has to have a real sense of adventure to enjoy a week long stay.  From what I’ve heard, the food is quite good so that’s a real plus!

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Yes, summer goes out with a big bang on Maine’s midcoast, but except for giving up my white jeans I’m going to enjoy it until it’s officially fall.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind