Meeting the Chickens

IMG_9284A friend very excited about her newly acquired chickens couldn’t wait to show them off.

I must say her feathered friends are being treated royally and claim as home a specially built coop.

IMG_9278I didn’t catch it at first, but check out the name.  That is so my friend!

As entertaining as her new beauties were, it was impossible not to let the eye be distracted by the drama of nature that was all around.

Every growing thing looked like it was on steroids which was attributed to fish emulsion.  I’m thinking that is a must for next year’s garden.

 Complementing nature’s bounty was the magic of the fog wafting in from the water.

Its quiet presence is a thing of wonder,

to say nothing about how its veiled mystery enhances color.

At every turn there were breathtaking vignettes with an astounding variety of color and texture.  Remembering that a short time ago there was nothing more than grass between the house and the shore makes all this bounty even more remarkable.

I think you will agree that it would be very easy to spend hours right here listening to the sound of the sea, watching the fog come and go, experiencing the quiet beauty of nature and keeping company with the chickens that are sure to come calling.

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Gardens Galore

Fog: A Sure Thing

When you live on the coast of Maine, fog is a sure thing.  It may last for only a few hours or for a day.  Rarely does it linger longer, but it can which means staying inside and getting caught up on neglected chores or reading or working a jigsaw puzzle.

Here on Rockport Harbor, it is interesting to watch the fog’s journey.  Today it is creeping in from Penobscot Bay on little cat feet.

Left behind is a sky so blue that it makes the contrast between clear and mist even more dramatic.As the fog makes its way into the harbor, it begins to wrap the trees along the shore in a transparent veil.

It slinks above the boats rocking gently on their moorings

and makes its way to the head of the harbor where it outlines the vessels tied at the pier.

Gradually, the fog thickens hiding all hints of blue sky and shrouding everything in its path.

As I stand and watch the fog blanket the harbor,  all but that which is a few feet away becomes invisible. Whether it is here to stay or to disappear  soon only time will tell.  For now, it is intriguing to follow fog’s journey which makes me again marvel at nature’s mysterious ways.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

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Dishing It & Digging It

 

Fall is………

fall on the hillsI grew up in south Florida and have spent most of my adult life in Houston, so experiencing fall in Maine is a special treat.  As many of you have said, fall means cooler temperatures and changing leaves.  While that is true, fall is much more than that to me.blueberry field, fall

Fall is fields of wild blueberries glowing brilliantly under a shining sun before slumbering for the winter.

pumpkinsFall is pumpkins of every size, shape and texture.

Rockport HarborFall is watching the harbor as one by one boats disappear until there are just a few whose hearty owners will brave a few more cool afternoon sails.

lobster boatFall is watching lobster boats go out later in the morning and return with traps, a sure indication lobstering is coming to an end.

fall/hydrangeaFall is hydrangea trees with blooms that change from white to dramatic pink in their final weeks

fall/hydrangeaand bushes holding on as long as possible to their Endless Summer beauty.

fall/woodFall is wood cut and stacked to keep winter fires burning.

fallFall is wearing warm clothing and taking walks in the woods

falland marveling over nature’s beauty.

fall/sunsetFall is having my breath taken away by the drama of sunsets which change from summer pastel to rich, deep tones that color both sky and water.

fall/sunsetMost of all fall is taking in the wonder of all that is around me and wishing that it did not signal the end of the time we spend in Maine each year.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

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Metamorphosis Monday

The Scoop

A Different Pancake

Rockport Harbor/winterOver the years I’ve shared with you photos of Rockport Harbor in winter.  

Rockport Harbor/winterMy visits there during the cold season are just long enough to see ice gathered at the mouth of the harbor

Rockport Harbor/winterand ice floes finding their way out to Penobscot Bay. 

Rockport Harbor - sea smoke 508 MASTER

Courtesy of Peter Ralston

There is the occasional fascinating sea smoke

Rockport Harbor/winterand gulls and ducks holding conventions on the ice.

Courtesy of Mark Van Baalen

Courtesy of Mark Van Baalen

Never, however, have I seen anything like this.  As explained by my friend Mark who sent the photo today, this is “pancake ice” which occurs on the ocean when it gets really cold as it has been now for days. The formations are caused by the gentle rocking of the waves which agitates slush and forms rounded blobs with upturned edges.  He explains that this kind of action is far more common in the Arctic than in Rockport Harbor.

Isn’t it fascinating what nature can do?  As interesting as this sight must be, I think I’d rather be in the warmer climes of Houston!  I am grateful to Mark though for sharing this most interesting information.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

Spray

I enjoy photo challenges.  They make you think about what you’ve seen and how, without thinking, you may have captured images that interpret the challenge.

Iceland/waterfallSPRAY….immediately I thought of waterfalls and geysers in Iceland.

Iceland/waterfallThere are so many, 

Iceland/waterfallmajestic, spraying rainbows into the air.

Iceland/waterfallTalk about spray, stand behind a waterfall and feel its wet cold.

Iceland/geyserFor a different spray, there are geysers

Iceland/geysererupting one after another sending hot spray in all directions.  That is not one you want to be near.

That waterfalls and geysers are there, powerful in their beauty, is another of those miracles that sets my heart racing.

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A Word a Week Photo Challenge: Spray

Rooted in Hope

Rosie and Opal

Rosie and Opal

Two brothers shared a passion for elephants that began when, as young men, they joined a circus. There they became attached to Rosie and Opal, Asian elephants now more than 40 years old, retired from the circus and in need of special care.

Several years ago the brothers began dreaming about bringing the two to Hope, Maine. Some people thought they were crazy to think of having Rosie and Opal in such an unnatural climate and environment, but persevere did the brothers and their dream became a reality.

Hope ElephantsHope Elephants has become a popular destination for visitors to Maine’s midcoast as well as an educational opportunity for school children throughout Maine.

Hope ElephantsThe facility not only provided a unique and caring environment for Rosie and Opal, it introduced children and adults  to the habits of these marvelous animals and increased awareness of their threatened plight and the importance of protecting wildlife.

Hope ElephantsFor three years, Rosie and Opal have been lovingly tended by one of the brothers whose veterinary skills vastly improved their quality of life. His commitment and dedication to Hope Elephants won admiration from people not only in the local community but throughout the world. Just this week a National Geographic reporter was in Hope to prepare a feature.

The story of Hope Elephants has in the last few days been tragically interrupted. Dr. Jim Laurita fell, hitting his head on a concrete floor. No one was there to witness the accident or what happened next, but this is what we hope is true.

Elephants have a tendency to use their trunks and feet to help an injured herd member. Seeing her loved caregiver down, one of the elephants tried to raise him, planting her foot on his chest and crushing it, causing death by asphyxiation.    Dr. Jim’s death has been ruled accidental, but that doesn’t lessen the impact of this incredibly sad incident.

Because currently there is no backup care for Rosie and Opal, they must be returned, as requested by Dr. Laurita should anything happen to him, to a facility in Oklahoma that cares for retired and aging elephants. They will be missed, but the passionate kindness of Dr. Jim Laurita will long be remembered.  It is hoped that one day Rosie and Opal or other elephants who need the special kind of care given at Hope Elephants will return.

Should any of you reading this post be touched by this story and wish to learn about a foundation established to honor Dr. Laurita and continue his work, you may learn more here.

i so appreciate your taking time to read this story