On the Water

Over the years, the hubby and I have boated in many different places.  While the experience is always pleasant, when it comes to great boating, there is for us no place like the midcoast of Maine.  Why?  Let me count the ways!

Maine islandsThe Islands.  There are some 3500 islands off Maine’s coast.  If all were connected to the mainland, it is said that the coast of Maine would stretch from its northernmost tip to Key West.

islandsMost are uninhabited, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be explored.  

Warren IslandOn some is evidence of lives once lived on the island.

heart rocksShorelines may yield unexpected treasures such as heart rocks or sea glass or sometimes raspberries and blueberries ripe for picking.

Maine islandFor sure every island is different.  All have rocks, some large and smooth,

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some craggy and difficult if not impossible to scale.

BrimstoneStill others have layers of small stones warm and smooth to the touch.

Perry Creek, fogInlets and harbors.  Nothing beats finding a secluded inlet or a protected harbor where you can anchor for a quiet afternoon or, perhaps, spend the night.

Perry CreekThere’s nothing like being on the boat under the night sky and seeing the moon lift from the horizon and climb higher and higher to cast its reflection on the water.

Yarmouth/lighthouseLighthouses.  I’m crazy for lighthouses, and there are many along the Maine coast.  

Most are no longer operative, but that doesn’t mean they don’t continue to stand proud.  

Matinicus RockSome are isolated, and I find myself wondering about the lighthouse keepers who once manned them.  Surely there are stories that could be told.

Fun places to eat.  The coast is dotted with dockside places to eat, and it’s so much fun to stumble upon a new one or return to a favorite.

fried clamsMost menus focus on seafood fresh from the water, and I always have a hard time refusing fried clams though recently I had a lobster grilled cheese that may be my new favorite.

Hey, enough writing.  It’s time to take advantage of a beautiful day and do a little boating!

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

 

WPC: Cover Art

lighthouse/maineAny time we are out on the boat and I see a lighthouse, I grab my camera meaning there are lots of pictures of lighthouses!  This day, as I was clicking away, a spray of water came up alongside the boat resulting in this magical photo.  I could never have staged this shot or timed it just right proving it’s the unanticipated action that sometimes makes for a surprising dramatic result.

 The photo reminds of an Impressionist painting that could grace the cover of an exhibition catalog or an art magazine.

Joining

Weekly Photo Challenge

Buck’s Harbor: A Favorite Destination

MaizyOn a lazy, hazy day Maizy is ready for a little cruise, so off we go to Buck’s Harbor, a peaceful and protected cove perfect for an overnight stay.

Pond Island

Pond Island

The getting there is one of the most beautiful passages on Penobscot Bay.    Cruising along , we pass islands with the most descriptive names: Pond, Butter, Eagle, Horsehead, Beach, Deer.  Each has its own character, and several are among my favorites to explore.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs we near Buck’s Harbor, way in the distance is the bridge that separates the mainland from Deer Isle.  Perhaps this is Maine’s version of the Golden Gate.

Buck's HarborA little closer, sitting on a rocky island, is a single dwelling that once housed a lighthouse keeper.  Like most other lighthouses in Maine, it is no longer in operation.  Still, I love thinking of them as guardians of the sea.

Buck's HarborBuck's HarborBuck's HarborBuck's HarborEntering Buck’s Harbor, we find we are not the only ones who think this a great spot.  Thunderstorms are forecast for later tonight, but all will be safe as the harbor is protected on all sides by land.  If you look at the differences in the sky, you can see those storm clouds brewing.

Linda  058Like many places in Maine, Buck’s Harbor has an interesting history.  It is the setting for many of Robert McCloskey’s children’s books including Blueberries for Sal, Time of Wonder and One Morning in Maine.

Buck's HarborIt is home to the Buck’s Harbor Yacht Club, built around 1912 and the third oldest yacht club in Maine.  Interestingly, its  burgee was the first private flag to be carried through the Panama Canal.

Buck's HarborAside from the yacht club, there’s not a whole lot in the town closest to the harbor, but what there is is quintessential Maine. There’s a real throwback general store where the motto is “We want to be the best little market in Maine”.  I can’t tell you whether or not it’s made it, but I can tell you it has some really good homemade cookies!

Buck's HarborShould the boat need stocking, there are also some good eats there.

Buck's HarborThere is a sweet little Methodist church which is why spending Saturday night here is a must.   Dogs are allowed to attend Sunday morning service, so Maizy can go, too.  I don’t know what it is about that church, but it feels so very right.

Buck's HarborWe managed to get ashore before the rains came, but when they came it was a downpour with lots of thunder and lightning.  The storm lasted more than 2 hours which meant a very leisurely dinner at Buck’s, not a bad deal at all.

Buck's HarborI hope you’ve enjoyed this little visit to Buck’s Harbor.  It’s a simple place where one can be surrounded by the beauty of nature and the charm of a very unspoiled Maine town.    As the sky clears and stars pop out one by one, illuminating the sky with sparkling diamonds, it seems the perfect place to be. 

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind