On the Water

Over the years, the hubby and I have boated in many different places.  While the experience is always pleasant, when it comes to great boating, there is for us no place like the midcoast of Maine.  Why?  Let me count the ways!

Maine islandsThe Islands.  There are some 3500 islands off Maine’s coast.  If all were connected to the mainland, it is said that the coast of Maine would stretch from its northernmost tip to Key West.

islandsMost are uninhabited, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be explored.  

Warren IslandOn some is evidence of lives once lived on the island.

heart rocksShorelines may yield unexpected treasures such as heart rocks or sea glass or sometimes raspberries and blueberries ripe for picking.

Maine islandFor sure every island is different.  All have rocks, some large and smooth,

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some craggy and difficult if not impossible to scale.

BrimstoneStill others have layers of small stones warm and smooth to the touch.

Perry Creek, fogInlets and harbors.  Nothing beats finding a secluded inlet or a protected harbor where you can anchor for a quiet afternoon or, perhaps, spend the night.

Perry CreekThere’s nothing like being on the boat under the night sky and seeing the moon lift from the horizon and climb higher and higher to cast its reflection on the water.

Yarmouth/lighthouseLighthouses.  I’m crazy for lighthouses, and there are many along the Maine coast.  

Most are no longer operative, but that doesn’t mean they don’t continue to stand proud.  

Matinicus RockSome are isolated, and I find myself wondering about the lighthouse keepers who once manned them.  Surely there are stories that could be told.

Fun places to eat.  The coast is dotted with dockside places to eat, and it’s so much fun to stumble upon a new one or return to a favorite.

fried clamsMost menus focus on seafood fresh from the water, and I always have a hard time refusing fried clams though recently I had a lobster grilled cheese that may be my new favorite.

Hey, enough writing.  It’s time to take advantage of a beautiful day and do a little boating!

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

 

The Last Leg

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter that unexpected stop in Portsmouth, we proceeded next day to the last of our scheduled destinations, Dolphin Marina on the Harpswell Peninsula in Maine.

This is a quiet place where at night inky black sky is alive with stars twinkling like diamonds.  This night we were also treated to the rising of a blood moon.  It came up behind the trees so fast that in a blink of an eye it was overhead.  I’m happy to have any photo, but my camera does not do justice to the drama of this moon or the moment.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter a peaceful night, the morning was greeted with super, both in size and taste, blueberry muffins that disappeared so quickly I almost didn’t get a shot!

islandsOn a perfect day to be asea, we decided on a leisurely cruise that would allow taking in all the beauty that defines Maine’s midcoast.  What I see along the shore and on the islands that dot the bay never ceases to enchant me.  There are few places where I feel more at peace or more grateful for the privilege that is my life

Along the way are some of my favorite lighthouses….Pemaquid Point, Southern Island, Whitehead, Owl’s Head

Indian Islandand, of course Indian Island at the entrance to Rockport Harbor.

Close to lunch time we were near Tenant’s Harbor which was good excuse to stop and try out Luke’s, new on the scene this year.  We were not disappointed!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs we enjoyed clam rolls, we chatted about our five day adventure, and the good news is we four are still friends after sharing close quarters and some harrowing moments.  These are the kind of people you like to have in your corner!  I’m glad to have had you along, too.

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

A Look at Campobello

Across the bridge from Lubec, Maine, and barely in Canada is the much visited Campobello Island.  The attractions you ask.  Well, there are not many.

At one end of the island is the West Quoddy Head Light, accessible only at low tide when you can walk across the rocks to it.

And there are whales to watch especially this time of year when they are breeding.  They were there, but all I saw were their blows.

The main attraction, however, is Campobello, FDR’s summer cottage and now an international park maintained beautifully by both Canada and the United States.

It is a lovely place with views to Passamaquoddy Bay and open spaces to be explored.

Inside, the house is simple but comfortable

with spacious areas for a large family

and 18 bedrooms  to accommodate them and their entourage.

It was in this master bedroom that FDR awoke in great pain and immobile, unexpectedly stricken by polio.  He laid here for five weeks before being transported by boat to Eastport and then by train to New York.  As the story is told, this was one of his last visits to his beloved Campobello, an island where he had spent time since he was one.

It is always interesting to visit landmarks that give us a glimpse into our country’s history.

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